Mechanistic, ecological, and evolutionary consequences of artificial light at night for insects: review and prospective

Abstract : The alternation of light and dark periods on a daily or seasonal time scale is of utmost importance for the synchronization of physiological and behavioral processes in the environment. For the last 2 dec- ades, artificial light at night (ALAN) has strongly increased worldwide, disrupting the photoperiod and its related physiological processes, and impacting the survival and reproduction of wild animals. ALAN is now considered as a major concern for biodiversity and human health. Here, we present why insects are relevant biological models to investigate the impact of ALAN. First the phenotypic responses to ALAN and their underpinning mechanisms are reviewed. The consequences for popula- tion dynamics, and the community composition and functioning are described in the second part. Because ALAN provides new and widespread selective pressure, we inventory evolutionary changes in response to this anthropogenic change. Finally, we identify promising future avenues, focusing on the necessity of understanding evolutionary processes that could help stakeholders consider darkness as a resource to preserve biodiversity as well as numerous ecosystem services in which insects are involved.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 11:05:04 AM
Last modification on : Wednesday, October 9, 2019 - 10:58:08 AM

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Emmanuel Desouhant, Elisa Gomes, Nathalie Mondy, Isabelle Amat. Mechanistic, ecological, and evolutionary consequences of artificial light at night for insects: review and prospective. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, Wiley, 2019, 167 (1), pp.37-58. ⟨hal-02015483⟩

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